Thursday, April 29, 2010

Handicapped vs. Disabled

Some may use these terms interchangeably. Handicapped vs. Disabled. Is there a difference? Is one politically correct?

Here's what Villanova University has to say about this matter:

A disability is a condition caused by an accident, trauma, genetics or disease which may limit a person’s mobility, hearing, vision, speech or mental function. Some people have more than one disability.

A handicap is physical or attitudinal constraint that is imposed upon a person, regardless of whether that person has a disability. A set a stairs would be a handicap for a person with a disability who uses a wheelchair.

According to eHow.com, one difference between the two terms is political correctness. Society views the term "disabled" as a politically correct way of saying "handicapped." If you want to be politically correct in your language and are not interested in the subtle difference between these two terms, use "disabled."

There used to be a society called the American Society for Handicapped Physicians (ASHP) and I've tried everything to reach them, but I haven't had any luck. If anyone knows anything about this organization, please contact us.

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